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Craig Copeland Presents & Collaborates at the 2018 Architectural Ceramic Assemblies Workshop (ACAW)

Craig Copeland Presents & Collaborates at the 2018 Architectural Ceramic Assemblies Workshop (ACAW)

Craig Copeland Presents & Collaborates at the 2018 Architectural Ceramic Assemblies Workshop (ACAW)

Buffalo, NY (August 16, 2018)

Associate Partner, Craig Copeland, AIA, LEED AP BD+C presented in the 2018 Architectural Ceramic Assemblies Workshop (ACAW) at the University of Buffalo. Sharing a personal journey studying and designing with ceramics and stone, starting with his Rome Fulbright studies of Etruscan funerary hut urns in the mid-90’s, his continuing research with Italian materials - particularly marble, and his more recent architectural projects with high-performance facades shaped with terracotta, Craig examined a two-tiered question: What might we still learn from ceramics of the past, and how can ceramics and stone today heighten performance and placemaking design in the future?

In addition to Craig’s lecture, he also participated in the Workshop’s main objective: to bring together representatives of academia and industry experts, who work in teams “in an exploratory environment – alternately guiding the design of facade solutions and contributing knowledge and experience to focus on the bioclimatic function of terra cotta.” Craig, working with team Radical/Matter, explored the design possibilities of opening up the convention of extrusion: both conceptually and literally; and how reorienting the extrusion could potentially provide new possibilities for structure, enclosure, and optical effects. Beyond the workshop, Radical/Matter intend to further explore non-standard extrusion strategies and their design potentials; the way extrusions can be opened up to develop facades, apertures, and enclosures; and develop systems with extrusions for kinetic screens that help modulate light, water, and air.

The ACAWorkshop’s goal is to educate and be educated by participants working in different areas of ceramic design. It [included] introductions to current design and manufacturing techniques, visits to architectural projects and daily lectures to stimulate our imagination on the potential of this material. A significant portion of the workshop [was] devoted to working collaboratively in teams to explore innovative design applications for ceramics as they pertain to bio-climatic functions. The teams [are] supported by a Boston Valley Terra Cotta adjunct and a UB architecture student who [assisted] them in developing designs for facades, walls, objects, and surfaces.”

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