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Tokyo American Club at home in new building by Pelli Clarke Pelli Architects

Tokyo American Club at home in new building by Pelli Clarke Pelli Architects

Tokyo American Club at home in new building by Pelli Clarke Pelli Architects

TOKYO (May 23, 2011) — The Tokyo American Club is now fully open in its new home by Pelli Clarke Pelli Architects. Activities at the private business and social networking club have been resuming since January, when the 20,700-square-meter clubhouse in the Azabudai neighborhood first opened its doors. A reception last week marked the start of full operations at the Pelli Clarke Pelli-design building, the club’s sixth incarnation since its founding in 1928 by 51 American businessmen in Yurakucho.

Overlooking the city from the crest of a hilltop, the new clubhouse is adjacent to the Azabudai Parkhouse condominium tower, also designed by Pelli Clarke Pelli Architects. With its garden terraces and a serene exterior of golden Chinese granite and glass set within concrete, the clubhouse is an oasis in one of Tokyo’s busiest neighborhoods. A glass-enclosed winter garden is at the center of the building. Formal and family functions are on either side.

“We designed the clubhouse to be both comfortable and elegant,” said Fred Clarke, senior principal of Pelli Clarke Pelli Architects. “Like a large house, the building accommodates many functions and welcomes multiple generations.”

The club offers a business center, guest suites, a spa, and venues for sports and family entertainment. There are more than 10 dining venues, which together can serve 1,354 members at one time. On the rooftop, a 25-meter swimming pool is enclosed under a vaulted steel-and-glass roof.

“This is a beautifully designed building that our members enjoy using,” said Alistair Gough, the club’s redevelopment director.

Each of the club’s 167 public rooms has a distinct character. Natural materials, such as travertine for floors and wood for ceilings, are used throughout. Two artists created work specifically for the building. Eriko Horiki, who works in washi paper, designed an installation for the winter garden and textile designer Reiko Sudo created wall hangings.

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