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Pelli Clarke Pelli designs new computer science complex at the University of Texas at Austin

Pelli Clarke Pelli designs new computer science complex at the University of Texas at Austin

Pelli Clarke Pelli designs new computer science complex at the University of Texas at Austin

NEW HAVEN, Conn. (October 28, 2010) — Pelli Clarke Pelli Architects’ latest academic building, a state-of-the computer science complex at the University of Texas at Austin, is now under construction.

Scheduled for completion in December 2012, the Bill & Melinda Gates Computer Science Complex consists of two buildings –Dell Computer Science Hall and the south wing –connected by an atrium. The new research-and-teaching complex will bring all programs, faculty and students of the Computer Science Department together for the first time in the history of the department.

“We are delighted to design an outstanding new home for the nation’s largest and most diverse top-10 computer science program,” said Fred Clarke, FAIA, Senior Principal of the firm and a UT-Austin graduate.

The design emphasizes modern uses of materials found in the Spanish Mediterranean buildings at the core of UT-Austin’s campus. Exterior walls will use the signature UT mix of Texas brick and colorful soffits will recall those of the older campus buildings. Large windows give a light, open appearance to the complex, which has been design to attain a LEED Silver rating.

To encourage discussion and collaboration, the complex is arranged in 10 research clusters, each with two glassed-in laboratories surrounded by offices, open discussion areas and a large conference room. The complex will include almost 20,000 assignable square feet of flexible research laboratory space, in addition to spaces for instruction, offices, and student organizations. The atrium will be the complex’s primary gathering place. Spacious bridges across the upper levels can be used for study and informal meetings.

The Gates Complex will be the second Pelli Clarke Pelli building on the UT campus, after the Sarah M. and Charles E. Seay Building. The firm’s work for higher education includes more than 50 projects on 30 campuses.

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